Treaty Education- Week 5

This week in class we discussed the importance of treaty education in the curriculum/ classroom. Which I have always understood to be an important subject to teach, but this week gave me more concrete reasons. This week also taught me how the different ways of teaching and approaching is also extremely important and what it truly means when we say “We are all treaty people”

Dear student, Teaching treaty education to students who are not of indigenous descents is extremely important, treaties still affect our country today making it still and important piece of knowledge to know, it is still our history. Teaching treaty education to all people is form for reconciling, teaching students about indigenous ways of knowing (medicine wheel etc), the genocide behind the treaty and the racism we see from the treaties. Not teaching treaties to someone due to culture is not teaching canadians their history.

As treaty card carrying Cree women, I have always known this statement to be true to me, but what I did not know till my later years of learning was that you do not have to carry a treaty card to be a treaty person. Being a treaty person also means taking part in the lessons of the treaty and being on and living on treaty land. I suggest reading and providing your students with Cynthia Chamber’s We Are All Treaty People  for them to understand this statement more in depth, Chamber’s provides her views of it from a person with no indigenous culture.

Hidden Curriculum

For my first assignment I deiced to take a closer look at the hidden curriculum, and how it has many negative outcomes for many of our students and their success in their later journey in education. Although the use of hidden curriculum are useful often time for us teachers we have to understand the negative impacts it can have for our students with disabilities or that may be on the autism spectrum. I will analyze Brownell J. Cassie article as my main piece which is titled “Starting where you, revisiting what: A letter to a first-year teacher addressing the hidden curriculum”along with“Cultural Factors Related to the Hidden Curriculum for Students With Autism and Related Disabilities” Lee Jung Hyo and Orón José “Revealing the Hidden Curriculum in Higher Education” to express how Brownell’s theory of hidden curriculum having the capability to be oppressive and hurtful to students is in fact true and how not acknowledging that the hidden curriculum is there can be harmful to our students and their futures.

Learning from Place- Week 4

The article suggests that a “critical pedagogy of place” aims to: a) identify, recover, and create material spaces and places that teach us how to live well in our total environments (reinhabitation); and (b) identify and change ways of thinking that injure and exploit other people and places (decolonization) (p.74). List some of the ways that you see reinhabitation and decolonization happening throughout the narrative. How might you adapt these ideas / consider place in your own subject areas and teaching?

One of the ways that I saw “critical pedagogy of place” show reinhabitation/ decolonization is how they brought the elders together for that were able to discuss their role ” In the early research design stages, it was evident that a community priority was bringing together Elders and youth so they could learn from one another about the role and meaning of the land to social well-being.” (page 73 ) I thinking the inclusion of elders in schools is one that although we are seeing more, still do not see enough. Elders have always played a strong role in indigenous cultures from story telling to passing down knowledge (medicine etc). So to see this in the articular is further showing how important elder knowledge is to decolonization and get a small sense of culture back.

The following relates to lost of language and land “According to one Mushkegowuk interviewee, paquataskamik is the Cree word used for traditional territory, all of the environment, nature, and everything it contains.
Noscheemik is the word for ‘camp,’ the bush, or a more specific area within
paquataskamik. For project participants, it was important to remember words like paquataskamik because they spoke to the broader project of territoriality and self-
determination within Mushkegowuk lands”(Page 77). When settlers came over their was huge lost of language has many feared speaking their mother tongue due punishment from residential school. The quote also goes into lost of ways of knowing being lost. We can bring this in to classroom by incorporate this by bringing some language into to the classroom and to teach how harmful that lost of land was. Also bringing students on a filed trip to become one with the lang to further push that importance land for reinhabitation and decolonization to happen.

Curriculum Theory and Practice

  In this week’s reading “Curriculum theory and practice” by Mark K Smith we were presented by four different approaches to curriculum 

  1. Curriculum as a body of knowledge to be transmitted.
  2. Curriculum as an attempt to achieve certain ends in students – product
  3. Curriculum as process.
  4. Curriculum as praxis

 Transmitted- This an effective approach to teaching curriculum to students in the form of a syllabus. Syllabus is different than curriculum, as it is described as a document that contains all the items that will be taught throughout the course, it is a very narrow set in stone way of teaching a curriculum. All of the courses I have taken in the university have been taught this way. With this method you are able to teach many of the things you need to and may want to and a fairly quick past, although the main drawback with this is the fact that is in a way “set in stone” so it does not leave room for questions or more time to be spent on something your students may be struggling with as you will fall behind. Curriculum transmitted also is not suited for all learning types, so many students may struggle with this method.   

Product- This method of teaching is set up as technical exercises, and was mainly used as a way for children to be good factory workers. There are many issues to curriculum being transferred to product , The first being that students tend to lose their voices Smith says “They are told what they must learn and how they will do it. The success or failure of both the programme and the individual learners is judged on the basis of whether pre-specified changes occur in the behaviour and person of the learner (the meeting of behavioural objectives). If the plan is tightly adhered to, there can only be limited opportunity for educators to make use of the interactions that occur”; Inturn this can really deteriorate creativity in students etc. 

Process– This method is largely based on how students behave and interact. This method is much more inclusive to students of many different abilities and disabilities. Although the process method is much more inclusive, it lacks the important emphasis on the context being taught. 

Praxis– In many ways the praxis method is a more developed version of the process model, it adds more of an emphasis on relationship with the students. It does not follow a strict plan making it easier for students to engage and follow along, ensuring no one gets left behind.

The Problem of Common Sense Responds

Kumashiro defines common sense as certain things or people. It is Important to understand that where and how we grow up gravely affects what we define as common sense. Many times we do not take into consideration what others people’s ideas of common sense are. Kumashiro explains to us when his view of common sense were  profoundly challenged when he went to Nepal to teach. He explains how when he was in Nepal his view on meals, washrooms and overall daily activities were challenged. Kumahiro also explains how the schooling he received in the USA was largely different as well, and how as a teacher used to his “common sense” way of teaching was tremendously different to those in Nepal. In Nepal it was common for teachers to hit the student, in fact even encouraged. Grades were only based off of one end of the year test. Which brings up the idea of common sense is often oppressive. Kumashiro brings up the idea of anti-oppressive education, a contest change in how we teach etc. This may be a scary idea to most teachers as we all tend to fear change, but this is the only way education can be equal to all.

The Problem Of Common Sense

kumashiro defines common sense as certain things or people. It is Important to understand that where and how we grow up gravely affects what we define as common sense. Many times we do not take into consideration what others people’s ideas of common sense are. Kumashiro explains to us when his view of common sense were  profoundly challenged when he went to Nepal to teach. He explains how when he was in Nepal his view on meals, washrooms and overall daily activities were challenged. Kumahiro also explains how the schooling he received in the USA was largely different as well, and how as a teacher used to his “common sense” way of teaching was tremendously different to those in Nepal. In Nepal it was common for teachers to hit the student, in fact even encouraged. Grades were only based off of one end of the year test. Which brings up the idea of common sense is often oppressive. Kumashiro brings up the idea of anti-oppressive education, a contest change in how we teach etc. This may be a scary idea to most teachers as we all tend to fear change, but this is the only way education can be equal to all.

Welcome

Welcome to my blog!

I created this blog to document my journey to becoming a teacher. I am currently enrolled at the University of Regina in my second year K-5 Education program.

I am born and raised in Regina Sask and grew up with four sisters. I graduated from high school in 2017 and took a year off of school to work in a daycare.

I have always had a passion for teaching and love working with kids, so teaching has always been my dream profession.

Thank you,

Brooke St Jean

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